Tag Archives: fine arts

Workshop with the National Trust at Hatchlands ParkHatchlands Park 2

We are very pleased to offer a SPECIAL SESSION in partnership with the National Trust this summer at beautiful Hatchlands Park .  This parkland is mentioned in the Domesday Book while the Georgian mansion, built in 1750 by Admiral Boscawen with architect Stiff Ledbetter, has been home to several interesting and historical families over the years.

See Shakespeare’s famous portrait, explore one of Europe’s largest collection of musical instruments, the Cobbe Collection, tour this beautiful and historical mansion and gardens while learning to make your own hand bound books.  A great day out with a well made, beautiful book of your own to take home!

National TrustWorkshop Date & Time:
Thursday, 16 July 2015, 9am – 1pm
Entry to the house and gardens, workshop tuition, materials and refreshments included.

“Learn the basics of bookbinding and create your own book. This session covers book boards, papers and cloths, grain, adhesives and pattern making as well as a range of specialist materials and tools to use.  Learn reliable techniques for measuring, cutting, aligning, folding, gluing and pressing to produce beautiful, hand-bound books of sound and lasting construction. Students will complete one multi-section, hard cover book making a perfect sketchbook, diary or gift, all under the guidance of expert tutor Meg Green. Tea, coffee and cake will be provided in the price of your ticket.”

After a devastating fire destroyed much of beautiful Clandon Park we will be holding our Summer Workshops at nearby Hatchlands Park. You can still book ONLINE with the Clandon Park site or contact Some Odd Pages studio or the National Trust to reserve your place.

New Ashgate Gallery Summer Exhibition 2014

Peter Layton New Ashgate Gallery Farnham Surrey UK arts

We are absolutely chuffingly chuffed to have our work featured alongside such brilliant artists as Peter Layton at the New Ashgate Gallery’s Summer Exhibition!  Peter’s new glass sculptures are really exciting and we are so proud to share a space with his work.

The New Ashgate is situated in Farnham a short drive down the A3 and A31 along the Hog’s Back.  What an excellent excuse for a jolly day out in lovely, leafy #Surrey.

The New Ashgate

Waggon Yard, Farnham
Surrey GU9 7PS
01252 713208
gallery@newashgate.org.uk

 

What is ‘PERFECT’?

'Story Line' Artist Book, What is perfectIs it when the grid is straight?
When the edges line up?
When all the colour stays inside the lines?

Maybe.  But not necessarily.

Very often I watch students experience anxiety as they work through a new process, cut into new materials or make the first marks of a text or drawing onto a white page.  They say things like, ‘I’m so nervous – I want it to be PERFECT.’   What does this mean and why is it the cause of so much anxiety?

It is disturbing that ideas of ‘Perfect’ are increasingly being replaced by ideas of machine-made. This arbitrary exchange of one set of subjective aesthetics for another clouds our judgement and undervalues the meaning and intent of original artworks.  This is especially important in Book Arts as the commercial manufacture of books is at an all time peak.  If we want a hand made book to look like it came from Paperchase, why don’t we just go to Paperchase and buy one?  It would be far simpler and less expensive.  Forcing a hand bound book to impersonate a machined object only conceals and subverts the essential nature of the hand made thing as well as the artist’s intention in making.

Do we want our books to look machined? Do we want all the edges to line up? All the angles to be square?  Maybe, but that’s not the point.  The point is that Some Odd Pages is hereby redefining PERFECT, particularly in regard to Artists’ Books, original artworks, and indeed all objects made by hand.  So, here it is officially:

PERFECT is determined by how well the object
EMBODIES THE ARTIST’S INTENTION
.

So, if aligned edges are essential to your concept, if straight geometry enacts your idea, if colouring inside the lines realises your intention, then so they should be.  On the other hand, if a big splashy, splodgey tangle of lines, cords, shapes and textures substantiates your vision then clearly it is PERFECT on its own terms.

Artist's Book, original painting, Coptic bindingThis in no way compromises the value of excellence in craftsmanship.  Expertise in materials, techniques and skills comes with time and practice.  If you don’t want your Artist’s Books to have all those glue marks all over the spine and covers perhaps it’s time to rethink how you arrange your workspace.  If you like clean well-laid corners and insets as much a I do, spacious unmarked margins, tight strong bindings which really support the weight of the book block, then it’s important to explore and practice ways of achieving this through workshops, experimentation and experience.

A ‘connoisseur’ is literally ‘one who knows’.  This idea isn’t restricted to the highest levels of making and achievement.  One who knows is acquainted with a subject across a broad range of styles, methods, materials and outcomes embracing a vast range of effects and results, from the clean and pristine to the wild and woolly.  Through practice, vision, intent and connoisseurship does the artist achieve artworks of perfection.