Tag Archives: bookmark

‘WORDSCAPE’

UWE Bookmark

‘Wordscape’

This year’s limited Artist Edition bookmark for the University of the West of England’s Centre for Fine Print Research is inspired by the wonderfully graphic depictions of physical geography and the landmarks of local and regional identity.  The closer you look, the more there is to discover!  A book is a portal to another time and place creating wordscapes of our imagination.

 

UWE Bookmark 2015:  ‘Jove’s Brother’UWE Bookmark 2015

Just completed, this year’s SPECIAL EDITION BOOKMARK for the University of the West of England‘s Centre for Fine Print Research ‘Bookmarks’ project is about to be shipped!

Inspired by Meg Green’s work, ‘JOVE’S BROTHER’, this edition of 100 signed and numbered bookmarks includes the electronically readable QR CODE of Jove’s Brother, transparent text and a random slice of Herman Melville’s iconic ‘MOBY DICK’ riveted together in layers.

The UWE ‘Bookmarks’ project aims to encourage appreciation of artists’ books as works of art. Participating artists each produce an edition of 100 signed and numbered bookmarks to give away through distribution boxes at venues around the world.  Over the years these bookmarks have been distributed in more than 125 galleries, bookstores, workshops, centres, schools and libraries in Australia, Brazil, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Denmark, Egypt, France, Germany, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Singapore, Spain, South Korea, Switzerland, Turkey, the UK and USA.

Order your own 2015 signed, numbered limited artist edition bookmark ‘Jove’s Brother’ by Meg Green.


Jove's Brother UWE Bookmark 2015 (3)   Jove's Brother UWE Bookmark 2015 (2)

More about ‘Jove’s Brother’

An observation on our evolving relationship with books and reading in a digital age.  Get out your QR code reader to explore this new book on reading in the age of digital media.

“Why did the Greeks give it a separate deity and own brother of Jove?  It is the image of the ungraspable phantom of life; and this is the key to it all.”    –  Herman Melville, Moby Dick, 1851

Artist Book kindle e-reader

‘Jove’s Brother’ by Meg Green 2015

The discussion surrounding overtaking technologies isn’t new, it’s one we have every time a new technology redraws the ways in which we perceive and communicate ideas.  Photography was supposed to have killed painting, video was supposed to have killed film.  Once upon a time, books were the new ‘technology’ that threatened the practice of impressing pointy Cuneiform shapes into little clay tablets.

Clearly, digital books aren’t somehow ‘better‘ than conventional paper books, they’re simply a different medium of exchange.  We aren’t confused about it either, we see and feel the differences between a conventional book and an e-reader, a paper page and a digital screen.

We are physical creatures, our perceptions conceived and conducted within our organic brains and bodies.  We maintain physical immediacy with the objects through which we express ourselves, exchange experiences and communicate ideas.  Our methods continue to change and evolve but this helps refine our subtlety and depth of understanding, our relationship to ‘reading’, books, text, coded images and abstract perceptions.

The Codex and The Screen: Stating the ObviousOriginal Artist's Book by Meg Green

The book: a codex of turnable paper(?) pages assembled within covers comprising a set of material properties specific to its construction.  The illuminated screen, whether an e-reader, mobile phone, laptop or billboard, obviously behaves in ways specific to its own material properties.  The idea of Reading has traditionally implied a universality across all forms of media => Reading is reading, without regard to the format or context of the material.

However, the way we interact with different types of reading is now the pivot of change in digital media.  Reading is no longer a universal or uniform activity irrespective of the mediating device.  Marshall McLuhan taught us this decades ago with ‘The Medium is the Massage’.  We ‘read’ differently from a screen, a mobile, a roadside sign, or a paper codex.  It’s not just about absorbing information or finding things out, an activity well served by the internet.  The aesthetic experience of reading depends on the way we access it.  Memory, retention and depth depend on the material properties we select for different types of reading.

Research on the changing way we readOriginal Artist's Book by Meg Green

A new European study led by Anne Mangen of Norway’s Stavanger University documents differences in the immersion, recall and emotional responses based on whether material is presented in traditional paper book form or via digital e-reader.  Researchers found that digital reading is becoming more intermittent and fragmented.  They also found that the time invested in sustained reading strengthens our ability to maintain long term focus, improves our understanding of depth, complexity and layered meaning, and provides a more thoroughly immersive experience.  Sustained focus helps people, especially children at formative education levels, prepare for and negotiate complex life situations with more balanced references to deeper memory and cultural experiences.

Why Moby DickOriginal Artist's Book by Meg Green

I turned to Herman Melville’s ‘Moby Dick’ as an intuitive choice specifically appropriate to my vision for this work.

Moby Dick is famously debated as one of the few compositions in any language about which no one seems to agree on its content.  Ask any number of scholars, professors, casual readers or innocent bystanders what it’s ABOUT and you will get as many answers as there are questions.  There are central themes, of course, but there is no consensus on the subject of this book.  Is it about fishing?  About the sea?  A philosophical discussion about Savage Nature versus the Devine?  Yes.  And no.

The open, ongoing and seemingly timeless discussion on the nature of ‘Moby Dick’ embodies Melville’s intention with a stroke of ironic perfection.   Melville’s text is to reading what Ahab’s obsession is to life.  What ‘Moby Dick’ is about forms part of the profound mystery of the sea and ourselves, it is archetypal.Original Artist's Book by Meg Green

Guildhall Library Exhibtion ‘LondEnfold’
18 Nov – 13 Dec 2014

Book artist Meg Green has created a series of works inspired by the archives of Guildhall Library, the largest collection in the world
devoted to the history of a single city.

In a special Guildhall LIbrary Exhibition, these unique hand-bound books expand off the page and climb out of the covers depicting some of the more unusual aspects of London’s extraordinary sense of place.

‘Treasure’Treasure 08

Eight hinged folios, Index, Drop down panel box.
Each folio contains a detailed composition inspired by a specific book within the Guildhall Library.  Discover the details of each book by matching the folio image to the Index thumbnail to locate it within the archives.
Look INSIDE the box!

‘selected BROADSIDES of the Guildhall Library’Broadsides Guildhall Library

Fold-out reversible pamphlet.
Inspired by the Broadsides collections of Guildhall Library.
Twelve panels depicting details of selected Broadside sheets within Guildhall Library’s archives.  Each panel includes the Broadside archive reference number.
Open this book and SEE all the pages!

‘LondEnfold’Guildhall Library Exhibtion

Back-to-back book with fold-out timeline and diptych.
Pictorial timeline of the history of Guildhall Library informed by Dr. Peter Cook’s 2012 lecture for Gresham College on this subject.  Layout and artwork inspired by  the architecture of Guildhall Yard and the Roman Amphitheatre situated directly beneath street level, access via Guildhall Art Gallery.

Guildhall Library Exhibtion Guildhall Library Exhibtion

Evening view & reception: ‘LondEnfold’
Thursday, 11 December, 6 – 8pm
CONTACT: GHLevents@cityoflondon.gov.uk
or register with Some Odd Pages on Facebook

“Guildhall Library Artist-In-Residence Meg Green presents ‘LondEnfold’ a range of original Artist’s Books inspired by the Library’s collections. Meg will be discussing books as artworks, and vice versa, along with some of the eccentric ideas and projects which fuel this unusual occupation. The presentation will be followed by an open reception where visitors are invited to browse the Artist’s Books with time for questions and discussion.”

An Introduction to Books Arts
Thursday, 4 December, 1 – 4pm

£45 Advance booking essential
“Discover a range of techniques and make your own books during this half-day workshop. Led by Meg Green of Some Odd Pages Book Arts studio, this interactive session lets you explore materials and develop your own ideas in Book Arts and bookbinding, perfect for creating unique artist’s books and for Christmas. Materials included, tools provided. No experience necessary.”

Book Arts exhibition

BOUND online Book Arts exhibition 16 – 30 April 2014

Some Odd Pages celebrates UNESCO World Book Day 2014 with an online exhibition of Book Arts featuring work across a wide range of skills, interests and charmingly bookish eccentricities.

See the unique works of 12 Book Artists and Bookbinders

Many of these works are available for purchase.  Your purchase helps individual Book Artists making unique books unlike anything you’ll find in shops or online through big corporate retailers.  Support hand made books that are really special, a wonderfully intriguing addition to your own library or to give as one-of-a-kind gifts.

There are so many reasons to celebrate 23 APRIL as Books and Roses day.  Here are some of the best:
To promote universal access to reading, writing, literacy and education
To promote cultural diversity, exchange and understanding
To improve access to culturally relevant reading materials in local and regional languages
To celebrate books as the global archive of humanity

Irina Bokova, Director General of UNESCO: 
“Our relationship with books determines our relationship with culture.  In all formats books embody ideas and values considered worthy of pursuit and preservation.”

Happy World Book Day 2014!

UWE: University of the West of England, Ltd Ed BookmarkUWE Bookmark Artist Edition

Final edition of 100 signed and numbered bookmarks for the University of the West of England, Centre for Fine Print Research. ‘Mapping West Penwith’ iss a different approach to mapping a personal sense of place in the far western Cornish peninsula.

See more about this annual project at BOOKMARKS

The annual ‘Bookmarks’ projects encourage appreciation of Artist’s Books. Participating artists each produce an edition of 100 signed and numbered bookmarks to give away through distribution boxes at venues around the world.  Each bookmark has the website address which brings visitors to the online gallery of artworks.

Over the last ten years, the Bookmarks projects of free artwork distribution has visited 105 galleries, bookstores, workshops, centres, schools and libraries in Australia, Brazil, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Denmark, Egypt, France, Germany, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Poland, Singapore, Spain, South Korea, Switzerland, Turkey, the UK and USA.

423 artists have contributed 42,300 bookmarks to the eleven projects to date. Editioned bookmarks are collated into sets; one full set being sent to each of the contributing artists and the rest divided and sent in distribution boxes to participating host venues around the world, for visitors to take.

Have a look through all the inspired and highly original bookmark artworks at:

http://www.bookarts.uwe.ac.uk/bookmark.htm

Participating Artists for the 2013 project:

http://www.bookarts.uwe.ac.uk/bkmks11/artists.htm

 

UWE Bookmark 2013

UWE Bookmark preparation

 

UWE Limited edition bookmark: ‘Infiltrating Libraries’

Trying to work out a different approach to landscape: sketches for UWE Bookmark project. (My Local, 247 miles away. Yep, that’s a chip stain across our old map.)

The Bookmarks projects series aims to encourage appreciation of work in the format of the artist’s book. Participating artists each produce an edition of 100 signed and numbered bookmarks to give away through distribution boxes at venues around the world. Each bookmark has the website address which brings visitors to the gallery of artworks online.

Over the last ten years, the Bookmarks series of free artwork distribution has visited 105 galleries, bookstores, workshops, centres, schools and libraries in Australia, Brazil, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Denmark, Egypt, France, Germany, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Poland, Singapore, Spain, South Korea, Switzerland, Turkey, the UK and USA.

423 artists have contributed 42,300 bookmarks to the eleven projects to date. Editioned bookmarks are collated into sets; one full set being sent to each of the contributing artists and the rest divided and sent in distribution boxes to participating host venues around the world, for visitors to take.