Guildhall Library

Guildhall Library Exhibition ‘LondEnfold’

Book artist Meg Green has created a series of works inspired by the archives of Guildhall Library, the largest collection in the world devoted to the history of a single city.

These unique hand-bound books on exhibit at Guildhall Library expand off the page and climb out of the covers depicting London’s extraordinary sense of place.

‘Treasure’Treasure 08

Eight hinged folios, Index, Drop down panel box.
Each folio contains a detailed composition inspired by a specific book within the Guildhall Library.  Discover the details of each book by matching the folio image to the Index thumbnail to locate it within the archives.
Look INSIDE the box!

Unique volume.  Fine art quality, archival reproduction folios available by order.
Coloured pencil, ink, brass hinges.  Index bound with an adapted longstitch binding.
D 117mm x H 98mm x W 92mm

‘selected BROADSIDES of the Guildhall Library’Broadsides Guildhall Library

Fold-out reversible pamphlet.
Inspired by the Broadsides collections of Guildhall Library.
Twelve panels depicting details of selected Broadside sheets within Guildhall Library’s archives.  Each panel includes the Broadside archive reference number.
Open this book and SEE all the pages!

Open Artist’s Edition, signed and numbered.  Unlimited copies available by order.
Digital layout, inkjet printing, folded by hand.
A6 folded, opens out to A3 format.

‘LondEnfold’Book arts exhibition London

Back-to-back book with fold-out timeline and diptych.
Pictorial timeline of the history of Guildhall Library informed by Dr. Peter Cook’s 2012 lecture for Gresham College on this subject.  Layout and artwork inspired by  the architecture of Guildhall Yard and the Roman Amphitheatre situated directly beneath street level, access via Guildhall Art Gallery.

Unique volume.  Archival reproduction diptych available by order.
Watercolour, pencil, coloured pencil, ink, metallic paint.
H 300mm x W 230mm

“I’m interested in London’s extraordinary Sense of Place.   
Guildhall Library and Yard have evolved over many centuries on the site of the original Roman Amphitheatre of ancient Londinium. There is such depth and intrigue to London’s character which has accumulated through such a vast period of time in this particular place. 

Guildhall Library’s archives comprise the world’s most extensive collection on the history of a single city in addition to several other collections of special interest.  In selecting books from the archives to inspire this project, I wanted my work to incorporate the influence of the people who safeguard and manage these collections.  Their expertise is vast and thorough.  By asking Guildhall’s librarians to recommend their own favourite works to my attention, I’ve learned a great deal about London, its history and character which I had no idea I was looking for when I began last April.  

This idiosyncratic approach to research reinforces not only the wonderful value of professional librarians but also broadens the experience of inspiration and affirms the value of an ‘organic search’ in the creative process.  These artworks respond to the specific sense of place of Guildhall Library and Yard and their unique aspect within London’s long and complex history as well as a somewhat eccentric path of inspiration within the stacks of one of the oldest and most interesting libraries in England.”

– Meg Green, 18 November 2014

Guildhall Library are hosting two special events accompanying this exhibition

Evening view & reception: ‘LondEnfold’
Thursday, 11 December, 6 – 8pm
CONTACT: GHLevents@cityoflondon.gov.uk or register with Some Odd Pages on Facebook

“Guildhall Library Artist-In-Residence Meg Green presents ‘LondEnfold’ a range of original Artist’s Books inspired by the Library’s collections. Meg will be discussing books as artworks, and vice versa, along with some of the eccentric ideas and projects which fuel this unusual occupation. The presentation will be followed by an open reception where visitors are invited to browse the Artist’s Books with time for questions and discussion.”

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